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SCOTT LISTFIELD



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SOUND ARTISTS, HARRY YEFF AND TRUNG BAO, TRANSFORM VOICES INTO GEM STONES IN LANDMARK EXHIBITION

The new 400 square metre immersive gallery will present wall-to-wall digital gemstone artworks from a selection of the VOICE GEM archive...

DIGITAL LEGACIES

Dropbox has more than 700 million registered users across 180 countries. Where we once cut-and-pasted photographs into physical photo albums, we now save our images on iCloud. Answering machine messages are locked behind passcodes...

SPEECH RECOGNITION: THE VOICE GEM SYSTEM OF HARRY YEFF & TRUNG BAO

In a basement gallery under London's Oxford Street, Jeremy Allen discovers a cache of precious stones formedfromthe voices of Ai Weiwei, Lily Cole and Sir Geoff Hurst

GENERATING GEMSTONES FROM VOICE – VOICE GEMS: 1000 YEAR ARCHIVE IMMERSIVE EXPERIENCE

Pioneering artists Harry Yeff and Trung Bao opened an immersive experience in the basement of Flannels’ Oxford Street shop. VOICE GEMS: 1000 YEAR ARCHIVE is a unique...

Scott Listfield is known for his paintings featuring a lone exploratory astronaut lost in a landscape cluttered with

pop culture icons, corporate logos, and tongue-in-cheek science fiction references. Scott grew up in Boston and now lives in Los Angeles, but in between those stops he spent some time traveling the world. When he returned home from his travels he found, to his surprise, that it no longer felt like home. He got an entry level job and an entry level apartment, and made attempts to be an adult. But he couldn't shake the feeling of being out of place

in the world he was inhabiting. It was the turn of the 21st century and he had no flying car, no jetpack, no robot

best friend. The future was not what his favorite cartoons told him it would be.


Around this time he watched the Stanley Kubrick film 2001: A Space Odyssey for the first time, and started

painting astronauts. This was 20 years ago and he hasn't stopped yet.

Over the past year, as so many of us have retreated from the outside world and taken shelter at home, Scott's paintings have felt more and more like a depiction of our shared dystopian present than some far off future. The deserted streets and sense of isolation in his paintings have been echoed in uncanny ways by real life. While this has made his work more relevant than ever, he'd frankly be very ok with it if the real world stopped looking so much like his paintings.
Like, now, maybe......

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