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RICHARD MENSAH



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SOUND ARTISTS, HARRY YEFF AND TRUNG BAO, TRANSFORM VOICES INTO GEM STONES IN LANDMARK EXHIBITION

The new 400 square metre immersive gallery will present wall-to-wall digital gemstone artworks from a selection of the VOICE GEM archive...

DIGITAL LEGACIES

Dropbox has more than 700 million registered users across 180 countries. Where we once cut-and-pasted photographs into physical photo albums, we now save our images on iCloud. Answering machine messages are locked behind passcodes...

SPEECH RECOGNITION: THE VOICE GEM SYSTEM OF HARRY YEFF & TRUNG BAO

In a basement gallery under London's Oxford Street, Jeremy Allen discovers a cache of precious stones formedfromthe voices of Ai Weiwei, Lily Cole and Sir Geoff Hurst

GENERATING GEMSTONES FROM VOICE – VOICE GEMS: 1000 YEAR ARCHIVE IMMERSIVE EXPERIENCE

Pioneering artists Harry Yeff and Trung Bao opened an immersive experience in the basement of Flannels’ Oxford Street shop. VOICE GEMS: 1000 YEAR ARCHIVE is a unique...

Richard Mensah, born in Ghana, currently resides in London where he has his full-time studio and represented by Chilli Art Projects.

His style is mainly intuitive. He takes inspiration from his African heritage, childhood memories and everyday happenings and is very passionate about social issues. He does not limit himself in his work; he paints and creates as inspired. His love of colours, nature and fascination about everyday life scenes show through his work. He is deeply fascinated by shapes, movement and shades and light and tries to capture these in his paintings. His paintings and creations are vivid, bright bold colours, captures various emotions and combines abstract and realism.

‘The series reflect on the explosion of confidence and arts in the Black community during the Harlem Renaissance and more recently of African/Black arts and culture. This to many of us has ushered in a new ‘African/Black Renaissance’. The figures in the series depicts and exudes self-confidence, assurance, and a thriving person(s) which is often depicted in the various poses of the figures.

The artist uses the plantain leaves to serve both as an anchor for the artist own childhood memories growing up on the African continent and tries to link the subjects in the paintings to the African continent especially the western part as well.

The geometric circles in the background are deliberately interlink to show that even though we are spread around the globe we are still connected in so many ways.

May the renaissance continue live on and for it to be used in a positive way to change the world.

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